Welcome!NCC Computer Science

You've come to the right place!

Whether you are a transfer student looking to start an advanced degree or a programmer learning a new language or just looking to add skills to your tool set, NCC's Computer Science Department has Programs to meet your needs.

Learn More »

What Most Schools Don't Teach

See why Computer Science is the right place to start - or finish - your studies.

See More »

See What We're Planning

We publish our anticipated course offerings well in advance so you can make plans ahead of time.

View Info »

Testing Out Of CSA 105

Prove your expertise by passing our test - and you won't have to take CSA 105.

View details »


What Most Schools Don't TeachNCC Computer Science

Find out from the experts why Computer Science can be one of the most available - and lucrative - careers available.

Fairfield County, CT is desperate for competent, knowledgeable IT workers. Don't just have a job. Have an exciting career in IT - and get paid handsomely for it!

What Most Schools Don't Teach

View the longer (10 min.) version on our Google+ page

See What We're PlanningNCC Computer Science

We publish - and update - courses we plan to offer far into the future. And, as much as we can, we stick to it!

Of course, you have to do your part! See your advisor and register for classes as early as possible.

Future Course Offerings

These are the courses that we anticipate offering over the next 2 years. To view the current schedule, access the Course Search page.

Fall 2014

Spring 2015

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

CSC 108

CSC 108

CSC 108

CSC 108

CSC 224

 

CSC 224

 

CSC 226

CSC 226

CSC 226

CSC 226

CSC 233

CSC 233

CSC 233

CSC 233

 

CSC 234

 

CSC 234

   

CSC 235

 
     

CSC 241

       
   

CSC 255

 
 

CSC 257

 

CSC 257

CSC 262

 

CSC 262

 
 

CSC 263

 

CSC 263

CST 111

CST 111

CST 111

CST 111

   

CST 121

 

CST 153

CST 153

CST 153

CST 153

CST 180

CST 180

CST 180

CST 180

CST 181

 

CST 181

 
 

CST 182

 

CST 182

 

CST 183

 

CST 183

 

CST 205

   
 

CST 252

 

CST 252

CST 255

 

CST 255

 
 

CST 272

   
   

CST 273

 

CST 274

   

CST 274

Testing Out Of CSA 105NCC Computer Science

CSA 105 is a requirement in your major.

But, you think you already have computing skills that include the Office 2013 products Word, Excel and Powerpoint.

If you can prove your expertise in these applications and more by passing a test, you will not have to take CSA 105. And you will still receive the three credits that this course carries.

What Does That Mean?

The next exam will be given in mid-January. Check back here for information

Download the Credit By Exam Form

You will need to bring the above Credit By Exam form, stamped as paid by the Business Office, to the exam with you. The Business Office is located on the first floor of the East Campus. The cost for the test is $30. Students will also need an access code to register for MyITlab and enroll in the test course. The cost for the access code is $15. You will be instructed how to purchase the MyITLab access code on the day of the test. Purchasing the MyITLab access code must be done by credit card.

Note, no one will be admitted to take the test one half haour after its start on the day of the test. Also note that this will be the ONLY test date available. We give the test twice a year prior to the fall and spring semesters.

You will need to demonstrate college-level expertise in the following:

ProgramsNCC Computer Science

NCC's Computer Science programs range from full-fledged Associate's degrees to skills-targeted certificates. Whether you are looking to transfer and get a Bachelor's degree or trying to update your skills, you've come to the right place.

All of our programs include classes taught by acknowledged experts in the field: our faculty! Come see what makes us special. We promise you won't be disappointed.

Degree Programs

Computer Science

The curriculum includes a foundation of core courses in database development and programming languages, and permits students to select major electives that are best suited to their career goals and interests. This flexibility will enable the College better to prepare students for employment in a fast-moving field.

Requirements for the A.S. Degree (62-68 credits)
Core Requirements (33-35 Credits) Credits
ENG 101 Composition 3
ENG 102 Literature and Composition 3
MAT 186 Precalculus 4
CSC 108 Introduction to Programming 4
COM 173 Public Speaking 3
Lab Science Elective 4
Humanities Elective 3-4
Social Science Elective 3
Free Elective 6-8
   
Major Requirements (18-20 Credits)  
CSC 233 Database Development I 4
CSC 234 Database Development II 4
CST 255 XML for the WWW 4
2 Semester Programming Sequence 6-8
   
Major Electives (9-12 Credits)  
Any CSC or CST or MAT 200+ 9-12
   

Computer Science Degree Check Sheet (PDF)

Computer Security

This A.S. degree program prepares graduates for careers in the field of Computer and Information Security, equipping them with marketable skills and a targeted knowledge of the infrastructure that supports IT in business. The hands-on labs built into this program ensure that the graduates will have gone far beyond just theoretical studies.

Requirements for the A.S. Degree (64-66 credits)
Core Requirements (32-34 Credits) Credits
ENG 101 Composition 3
ENG 102 Literature and Composition 3
MAT 172 College Algebra (or higher) 3-4
CSC 108 Introduction to Programming 4
COM 173 Public Speaking 3
Lab Science Elective 4
Humanities Elective 3-4
Social Science Elective 3
Fine Arts Elective 3
Liberal Arts Elective 3
   
Major Requirements (32 Credits)  
CST 111 Internet Commerce Technology 3
CST 121 Operating Systems - An Introduction 4
CST 180 Networking I 4
CST 181 Networking II 4
CST 182 Networking III 4
CST 183 Networking IV 4
CST 272 Operations Security Technology 3
CST 273 Security Management Practices 3
CST 274 Network Security Technology 3
   

Coming Soon! Computer Security Degree Check Sheet (PDF)

Certificate Programs

Networking

This certificate will provide students with a broad understanding of networking with a focus on Wide Area Networking, as well as preparing them to obtain internationally recognized networking certifications. It is designed for students who are preparing to enter the job market as well as college graduates seeking retraining in emerging communication technologies.

Requirements (16 credits) Credits
CST 180 Networking I 4
CST 181 Networking II 4
CST 182 Networking III 4
CST 183 Networking IV 4
   

Networking Certificate Check Sheet (PDF)

Relational Database Development

This certificate program is designed for students who are preparing to enter the job market and want to earn a certificate on their way to earning an associate or bachelor’s degree. It also benefits students who already have college degrees and are seeking retraining in the technology. The program provides an understanding of client/server environment, relational database design and development, PL/SQL, Database Administration and vast knowledge of the Oracle package.

Requirements (12 credits) Credits
CSC 233 Database Development I 4
CSC 234 Database Development II 4
CSC 235 Database Development III 4
   

Relational Database Development Certificate Check Sheet (PDF)

Smartphone App Developer

This certificate prepares students to enter the fastest growing segment of the information technology application development marketplace. It includes basic programming skills, object-oriented programming techniques, an overview of current mobile platforms and device-specific advanced topics. Students completing the program will be able to create simple applications on a variety of devices and specialized programs on the device of their choice. Platforms currently offered include Apple iPhone, Google Android OS and Windows Phone.

Requirements (14 credits) Credits
CSC 108 Introduction to Programming 4
CSC 226 Object Oriented Programming Elective 4
CSC 262 Programming Mobile Devices I 3
CSC 263 Programming Mobile Devices II 3
   

Smartphone App Developer Certificate Check Sheet (PDF)

Web Developer

This certificate provides students with an in-depth study of Web Development. It is designed for students who are preparing to enter the job market as well as college graduates seeking retraining in the emerging technologies of the Internet.

Requirements (16 credits) Credits
CST 153 Web Development and Design I 4
CST 252 Web Development and Design II 4
CSC 226 Object Oriented Programming Using Java 4
CSC 224 Java Programming II or
CSC 257 Web Development With PHP
4
   

Web Developer Certificate Check Sheet (PDF)

Computer Science CoursesNCC Computer Science

Our courses teach students all levels of Computer Science. Students begin by using scientific inquiry to discover fundamental principles and then apply them in a variety of problem solving scenarios.

We strive to make sure that our classes reflect current trends in the industry. Our instructors continually update their skills so that you can develop yours.

Course Descriptions

CSA 098 Understanding Computers

3 Credits

The foundations necessary to use the computer as a tool. Topics covered include an introduction to information representation and its storage, fundamental applications of the computer and fundamentals of programming demonstrated through a high-level programming language. Programming laboratory projects in a closed laboratory environment supervised by the instructor. Two hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSA 105 Introduction to Software Applications

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 or Corequisite: ENG 088 or ESL 142. 3 Credits

his hands-on course, taught in a computer laboratory, provides an introduction to personal computers, basic understanding of Microsoft Windows and the Internet, myCommnet, Blackboard Learn, student email, Office 365, computer security and safety, and popular word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation tools. The course assumes no prior computing experience and is open to all students at the college, except those majoring in Computer Science. Emphasis in this course is on developing practical applications for personal productivity and safety. The specific software used in this course may change from semester to semester based on industry demand. In addition to supervised classroom exercises, weekly projects are required which will include elements of information literacy. A student who takes CSC 103, CSA 105 or BBG 114 can apply credits from only one of these courses toward graduation.

CSA 205 Advanced Applications

Prerequisite: CSA 105 or CSC 103. 3 Credits

A continuation of CSA 105, taught in a computer laboratory. Students should be prepared to begin working at the advanced level in each particular software package taught in the prerequisite introductory course. This course presents advanced coverage of Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, macros, and databases including relations and advanced reporting.

CSC 103 Computer Concepts and Applications

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 4 credits

An introduction to computer concepts: input, output, processor, hardware and software with emphasis on the information processing cycle, problem solving and algorithm development. A programming language is used to introduce the student to programming and to develop solutions to common computing problems.

CSC 108 Introduction to Programming

Prerequisite: Placement in MAT 172. 4 credits

Fundamentals of programming and program development techniques. Topics include data types, functions, storage class, selection, repetition, pointers, arrays, and file processing. Programming laboratory projects in a closed laboratory environment are supervised by the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 207 Introduction to Visual Basic.NET

Prerequisite: CSC 103 or knowledge of a programming language and familiarity with Microsoft Windows. 4 credits

A study of the Visual Basic system comprising visual design tools, event driven programming, object oriented programming, and debugging tools to create applications that take full advantage of the Windows graphic environment. Students will build bars, buttons, boxes and menus. They will use controls, conditional statements and loops, multiple windows, data types, sub/functions procedures, data control, multiple document interface, ado, ole, control arrays, dll, data access object and database interfacing. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 208 Advanced Visual Basic.NET

Prerequisites: CSC 207 and CSC 233 or equivalent SQL experience. 4 credits

Provides the student with advanced programming concepts with desktop and distributed systems. It will extend object-oriented application development utilizing both client-side and server-side technology. The course will focus heavily on database connectivity and management. The RDBMS that will be utilized will be Oracle and SQL-Server. N-Tier applications development will be utilized in the classroom and laboratory assignments. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 211 VB & ASP.NET Web Based Programming

Prerequisite: CSC 208 Advanced Visual Basic.NET. 3 credits

VB.NET provides web-based applications in a new and flexible way by encapsulating commonly used code into object-oriented controls. These controls can be fired by web site events. This course branches out into many other technologies such as Web Services, ADO.NET and advanced database usage, Custom Controls, and Security to provide the student with a complete range of the Internet technologies. This course will provide students with the.NET techniques that will enable them to create flexible, secure, and robust web sites that can collect and work with information in a multitude of ways to the benefit of the user.

CSC 213 Object Oriented Programming Using C++

Prerequisite: CSC 108. 4 credits

The advanced features of C++ programming and new tools of C++ will be covered in detail. Objects, classes, overloading, inheritance, virtual function, files, streams and class libraries will be discussed. Software design using object oriented programming techniques and the C++ programming language. Programming laboratory projects in a closed laboratory environment supervised by the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 224 Java Programming II

Prerequisite: CSC 226. 4 credits

This course picks up where the first Java Programming course left off, introducing the topics of threading and I/O. The remainder of the course serves to extend the student’s knowledge of using Java to build enterprise-strength applications, with exposure to both “fat” and “thin” client structures. The course will cover currently used structures of JBDC connectivity, JavaBeans, servlets, JSP and XML and XHTML. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 225 Cross Platform Web Services using the J2EE Platform

Prerequisites: CSC224 and CST255, or permission of instructor. 4 credits

The features and tools of Web Services will be covered in detail. This class will introduce the fundamentals of Web Services (XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI) and the underlying theories of how Web Services are required to behave. Further, the class will cover creating and implementing Web Services using the Java 2 Enterprise Edition platform. Comparisons with.NET Web Services will be offered. Programming laboratories, supervised by the instructor, will be given. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 226 Object Oriented Programming Using Java

Prerequisites: CSC 108 or CSC 207 or CSC 234 or CST 252 or permission of instructor. 4 credits

The features and tools of the Java programming language are covered in detail. The Object Oriented model is used in developing objectbased and object-oriented programs. The Java Virtual Machine and environment, classes, arrays, strings, inheritance, graphics, exceptions, I/O streams, and the Java API are discussed. Programming laboratory projects in closed laboratory environment, supervised by the instructor, are assigned. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 233 Database Development I

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 4 credits

Relational database development including data modeling, database design and database implementation. The student learns to create and alter tables, retrieve, insert, update, and delete data using a fourth generation language (ORACLE) in a supervised laboratory setting. Uses of database technology, understanding DBMS and RDBMS concepts, normalizing designs, transforming of logical design into physical databases, embedded SQL, and the role of the DBA are also covered. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 234 Database Development II

Prerequisite: CSC 233. 4 credits

Reinforcement of topics covered in CSC 233 as well as introduction of new topics including PL/SQL; creation of custom forms; functions; reports; additional ORACLE features; advanced calculations and multi-valued dependencies; and some current trends. A case study approach is used to apply concepts, methodologies and the ORACLE tools covered. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 235 Database Development III

Prerequisite: CSC 234. 4 credits

This course reviews SQL and focuses on advanced topics within Oracle, including PL/ SQL, Procedure Builder, Developer Tools and Integration, SQL tuning, with an emphasis on DBA, and features of new Oracle releases. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 241 Data Structures and Algorithms

Prerequisite: CSC 213 or CSC 226. 4 credits

Common data structures used to represent information in an object-oriented environment. Topics include stacks, queues, pointers, linked lists, binary trees, and hashing. Efficiencies of algorithms and their relations to data representation will be discussed. Programming laboratory projects in a closed laboratory environment supervised by the instructor. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 245 Introduction to C#

Prerequisite: CSC 207 or CSC 108 or CST 252 or CSC 234 or permission of instructor. 4 credits

The features and tools of the C# language will be covered in detail. Comparisons with Java and Visual Basic.Net will be offered. Visual Studio.NET environment, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, I/O, and the Common Language Runtime will be discussed. Programming laboratories, supervised by the instructor, will be given. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 246 Advanced C#

Prerequisite: CSC 245. 4 credits

This course picks up where the Introduction to C# course left off. The course serves to extend the student’s knowledge of using C# to build enterprise strength applications with exposure to both “fat” and “thin” client structures. The course will cover currently used structures of ADO.NET, ActiveX Component development, ASP.NET, WebForms, XML processing, and Web Services.

CSC 248 Cross Platform Web Services using.NET technology

Prerequisites: CST255 and either CSC211 or CSC246, or permission of instructor. 4 credits

The features and tools of Web Services will be covered in detail. This class will introduce the fundamentals of Web Services (XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI) and the underlying theories of how Web Services are required to behave. Further, the class will cover creating and implementing Web Services using the.NET technology. Comparisons with Java and other web service models such as EDI will be offered. Programming laboratories, supervised by the instructor, will be given. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 255 Systems Analysis, Design and Development

Prerequisite: One of the following: CSC 108, CSC 203 , CSC 207, or CSC 223. 4 credits

Systems analysis, design concepts and techniques used in the workplace to resolve business problems. The case study approach is used to apply the systems development life cycle. Students, working in teams, analyze a business problem and develop, design and implement an executable business system. Monitoring, evaluation, project management, feasibility analysis and documentation are emphasized. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CSC 257 Web Development With PHP

Prerequisite: CSC 108 or CSC 207, or permission of instructor. 3 credits

This course will introduce students to web development using PHP. Students will learn how to design web sites according to the MVC model. Object-oriented PHP will serve as the means by which the model component of the MVC-based web application is implemented. Session management will be used to deliver customized content. Students will also use the MySQL database in conjunction with PHP to create dynamic web applications. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

CSC 262 Programming Mobile Devices I

Prerequisite: CSC 108 or CSC 207. 3 credits

The course introduces students to the various platforms in use on small and mobile devices. Platforms include Apple iPhone, Google Android OS, Microsoft Windows Mobile and others. Students will create applications for each platform using specialized development environments. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 263 Programming Mobile Devices II

Prerequisite: CSC 262. 3 credits

The course builds on the knowledge gained in CSC 262 Programming Mobile Devices I by enabling the student to specialize in development on a single device. The device is chosen prior to offering the class. All aspects of the development are covered in the context of the device. Three hours lecture; two hours of laboratory.

CSC 295 Cooperative Education/ Work Experience

Prerequisites: ENG 101, minimum 2.0 GPA, sophomore status, advanced programming course and approval of the department chair. 3 credits

This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job learning. Students, who meet program eligibility work at an approved Cooperative Education site, attend a regularly scheduled seminar on campus. The seminar covers the establishment of learning goals for the work assignment, career development and work-related problem solving. Faculty assign a final project designed to elicit on-the-job learning specific to computer security, computer systems technology, information systems, or information technology. Students must satisfactorily complete the seminar, the final project, and the work assignment to receive credit.

CST 111 Internet Commerce Technology

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 3 credits

This introductory course covers the current technologies supporting today’s Internet commerce initiatives and the business rationales for conducting commerce via electronic rather than traditional means. Some of the technologies explored in the course include payment systems, web server tools, and security systems.

CST 121 Operating Systems, an Introduction

Prerequisite: CST 180 or CSC 108 or any 200 level CST or CSC course with a grade of C or higher. 4 credits

Operating Systems provides an introduction to Unix based operating systems. The course focuses on basic skills in using a command line operating system. Students will learn the characteristics of the common Unix shells, the Unix based file and directory system, file management, permissions, the “vi” editor, and basic computer networking concepts and commands. Graphical user interface environments and PC operating systems will be discussed. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 141 Computer Hardware

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 4 credits

This course provides hands-on experience and skills development necessary to install, service and support microcomputers. Each section focuses on the key concepts for A+ Certification testing. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 153 Web Development and Design I

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 or Corequisite ENG 088. 4 credits

This course provides the entry into the fast moving website development industry. With its heavy hands-on mode of delivery, students will learn XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and be exposed to JavaScript. Adhering to standards, specifically from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA), will play a dominant role in the creation of web pages that are both platform and browser independent. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

CST 180 Networking I

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and eligibility for MAT 172. 4 credits

An introduction to computer networking concepts. Topics include the functions of the ISO/OSI reference model; data link and network addresses; the function of a MAC address; data encapsulation; the different classes of IP addresses (and subnetting); the functions of the TCP/IP network-layer protocols. The student learns to plan, design and install an Ethernet LAN using an extended or hierarchical star topology; to select, install, and test cable and determine wiring closet locations; to perform beginning network maintenance, tuning, and troubleshooting along with basic documenting, auditing and monitoring of LANs. This course consists of lecture, and computer based training, as well as hands-on laboratories. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 181 Networking II

Prerequisite: CST 180. 4 credits

This is the second in a series of four courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, OSI models, Ethernet, Token Ring, Fiber Distributed Data Interface, TCP/IP Addressing Protocol, dynamic routing, routing, and the network administrator’s role and function. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in solving networking problems. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 182 Networking III

Prerequisite: CST 181. 4 credits

This is the third course in the four-course series designed to introduce new content and extend previously learned networking skills. Instruction introduces and extends the student’s knowledge and practical experience with switches, Local Area Networks (LANs) and Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) design, configuration and maintenance. Students develop practical experience in skills related to configuring LANs, WANs, Novell networks, Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) routing and Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) protocols and network troubleshooting. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 183 Networking IV

Prerequisite: CST 182. 4 credits

This is the fourth course in the four-course series designed to introduce new content and extend previously learned networking skills. Instruction introduces and extends the student’s knowledge and practical experience with Wide Area Networks (WANs), Integrated Services Data Networks (ISDN), and Point-to-Point Protocols (PPP) and Frame Relay design, configuration and maintenance. Students develop practical experience in skills related to configuring WANs, ISDN, PPP and Frame Relay protocols and networking troubleshooting. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 191 Secure Wireless Networks

Prerequisite: ENG 101, CST 180 or equivalent. 3 credits

After an introduction to wireless networking, the course explores the options available for local area and personal area networking. Both design and implementation issues of practical wireless networks will be discussed. Hands-on projects will help reinforce the concepts presented. Wireless network security will be discussed in terms of the risks and the measures needed to secure them. Rogue access points and insecure network configurations will be discussed and students will develop their skills in identifying and mitigating these security threats. External threats such as eavesdropping, identity theft, and other evolving threats will be presented along with methods of making the wireless experiences secure.

CST 205 Project Management

Prerequisites: Sophomore status (30 credits) and completion of one of the following: CST 182 , CSC 234, CSC 208, CSC 213, CSC 223. 4 credits

This course covers the multiple facets of project management, from the initial discussions and specification sketches with the client through to implementation and documentation. Development of project plans, complete with measurable milestones, dependencies and failure points are covered, as are the standard PERT and GANTT c harts. A project management software tool is introduced and utilized within the scope of the class project. Each student, whether individually or as part of a team, will be responsible for taking an assigned project through the entire management life cycle3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 252 Web Development and Design II

Prerequisite: CST 153. 4 credits

As a continuation of the Web Development and Design I class, this course continues the knowledge and skills development of a web developer. The course covers JavaScript in detail. Fundamentals such as data types, functions, arrays, loops, and conditionals are included. AJAX and Web 2.0 programming skills are developed. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

CST 255 XML for the World Wide Web

Prerequisite: CST 252 or CSC 108 or CSC 207. 4 credits

The course builds on students’ knowledge of HTML and JavaScript in the rich world of XML. Topics covered include creating well-formed and valid XML documents, Document Type Definitions (DTDs), namespaces, entities, XML Schemas, formatting using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) and transformations using XSL Transformations (XSLT). 3 hours lecture; 2 hours of laboratory.

CST 272 Operations Security Technology

Prerequisite: CST 121 or Co-requisite CST182 Networking 3.

The Operations Security Technology course covers the identification of the controls over hardware and media and the operators with access privileges to any of these resources. A computer security professional is expected to know the resources that must be protected, the privileges that must be restricted, the control mechanisms available, the potential abuse of access, the appropriate controls, and the principles of good practice. All of these topics are addressed in the course.

CST 273 Security Management Practices

Prerequisites: ENG 101, CST 111, and CST 181. 3 credits

Security Management entails the identification of an organization’s information assets and the development, documentation, and implementation of policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines that ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability. This course will prepare the student to understand the planning, organization, and roles of individuals involved in security, develop security policies, and utilize management tools used to identify threats, classify assets, and rate vulnerabilities.

CST 274 Network Security Technology

Prerequisites: CST272 Operations Security Technology. 3 credits

The Network Security domain encompasses the structures, transmission methods, transport formats, and security measures used to provide integrity, availability, authentication, and confidentiality for transmissions over private and public communications networks and media. This course will give the student both the knowledge and hands-on practice in network security software, including preventive, detective, and corrective measures.

CST 279 Digital Forensics

Prerequisites: Eligibility for EN101, or any CST or CSC course with a grade of C or better. 3 credits

This course is an introduction to computer forensics. Topics include discussion of various types of computer crime and computer evidence, computer forensics standards and practices, the preparation of hardware for the acquiring of evidence, image techniques, computer forensics standards and practices. Students will gain a proficiency in using The Ultimate Toolkit from AccessData and ENcase Forensics Software Suite. They will also be learning how to collect, analyze and organize evidence through case studies. These topics will be reinforced through case studies, research and

FacultyNCC Computer Science

Our faculty bring a wealth of practical knowledge to NCC. Computer Science faculty at NCC are acknowledged experts in their fields. As technology changes, they continually update their skills so that they can give you the skills you need to succeed. And they can teach too!

Find out for yourself - register for a class today!

Faculty

Tom Duffy, Department Chair

Tom Duffy

tduffy@norwalk.edu

203-857-6892

Professor Tom Duffy is the Chair of the Computer Science Department and the Program Coordinator for the Computer Science degree as well as the Web Developer, Relational Database, and Smartphone App Development certificates. He teaches courses in Web Development, XML, Java, and Mobile Device Programming.

Tom holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Master of Arts degree in Mathematics/Computer Science from Western Connecticut State University. He is the owner of Bright Moments Software - a software company specializing in Web Technologies.

Tom has recently published Programming With Mobile Applications, his second book. The book is available from Cengage Learning.

Patrick Cassidy

Patrick Cassidy

pcassidy@norwalk.edu

203-857-7336

Professor Cassidy is the Coordinator for the Computer Security degree program at Norwalk Community College.  He is also the Main Contact for NCC’s Cisco Academy.

Before coming to NCC, Prof. Cassidy was a Project Associate for the University of Michigan working out of the General Motors Plant in Tarrytown, NY.  He has also taught at Westchester Community College in both the Mathematics and Computer Science departments.

He holds a M.S. in Computer Science from Polytechnic University, a B.S. in Aeronautical Science from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, and an A.S. in Mathematics and Science from Westchester Community College. Prof. Cassidy is a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) and Cisco Certified Academy Instructor (CCAI).  He also holds multiple ratings from the FAA as well as being a Certified Flight Instructor - Instrument (CFII).

Charles Gabor

Charles Gabor

cgabor@norwalk.edu

203-857-7315

Proessor Gabor teaches Java Programming, Web Development, and Database Development courses. Before joining the NCC faculty, he was a Lieutenant/Senior Military Instructor at the United States Naval Academy. Prior to that, he was a Software Engineer for Pitney Bowes Inc. He is currently working toward a doctorate in Educational Leadership (Ed.D.) at Southern Connecticut State University. He holds B.S. degree in Computer Science from the University of New Haven and a B.S. degree in Applied Science from Charter Oak State College. He is a member of the Honor Society in Computing Sciences, UPSILON PI EPSILON, and a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Naval Reserve.

Kerry Cramer

Kerry Cramer

kcramer@norwalk.edu

203-857-3332

Mr. Kerry V. Cramer is an information technology professional with 30 years experience in computer programming, information technologies, and IT project management. Mr. Cramer has been an adjunct professor at Manhattanville College, and University of New Haven teaching several courses in the Computer Science curriculum as well as substitute teaching K-12 at schools in the Danbury, CT area. Mr. Cramer's strengths include strong project management disciplines, technical, supervisory and team management skills in internet, Lotus Notes, and legacy application development and maintenance environments as well as extensive college and professional recruiting experience.

Contact UsNCC Computer Science

Computer Science Department
188 Richards Avenue
Suite: West 250
Norwalk, CT 06854
203-857-6892

Contact Faculty

Tom Duffy, Department Chair

Tom Duffy

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Patrick Cassidy

Patrick Cassidy

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Charles Gabor

Charles Gabor

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Kerry Cramer

Kerry Cramer

E-Mail

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